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Giornata Mondiale dell’Acqua: fra insopportabile retorica e democrazia negata

di Tommaso Fattori

DSCF32742009: il Comune di Parigi – città simbolo delle multinazionali dell’acqua – avvia la rimunicipalizzazione del servizio idrico. 2010: l’Assemblea Generale delle Nazioni Unite dichiara l’accesso all’acqua e ai servizi igienico sanitari un diritto umano. 2011: ventisette milioni di italiani – con il 96% di “sì” – votano contro la privatizzazione dei servizi pubblici locali e per l’eliminazione dei profitti dalla gestione del servizio idrico.

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UE: L’acqua è un diritto umano

Fattori: “La troika sta obbligando alcuni paesi come la Grecia a svendere i servizi idrici”

di Serafina Lombardo

L’iniziativa dei cittadini europei per l’accesso all’acqua come bene pubblico essenziale è arrivata in Commissione Petizioni. Ne abbiamo parlato con uno degli ambasciatori dell’iniziativa, Tommaso Fattori, tra i fondatori del Forum Italiano dei Movimenti per l’Acqua, della Rete europea dell’Acqua, nonché fra i primi promotori del Referendum del 2011.

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The European Citizens’ Initiative on Water and ‘Austeritarian’ Post-Democracy

377617_3761528630455_827313462_nBy Tommaso Fattori

In times of savage austerity, strategies to privatise public services are multiplying.

In particular, countries dependent on EU ‘aid’ are forced by the Troika to sell off water and other fundamental public utilities, as conditions for receiving EU loan packages. No surprise at similar “shock therapy”: neoliberalism uses the crisis to destroy social rights and privatise the commons – public goods and public services. In other words, austerity policy is an instrument of neoliberalism, and the objective of these policies was the exploitation of the opportunities opened up by the crisis, not the ending of the crisis. What is involved then is the continuing, or rather accelerating, of the redistribution of income, wealth and political power from the bottom to the top that has been taking place since the 1980s: an upside-down redistribution threatened by the sudden crisis and the failure of neoliberal policies.

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COMMONS: TOWARDS A LEGAL FRAMENWORK

Schermata 2014-03-05 alle 01.26.02By Tommaso Fattori

“It is commonly acknowledged that there is a legislative gap concerning the protection and recognition of the sphere of Commons (1). The consequence of these inadequate legal guarantees is the extreme vulnerability of Commons, which remain without protection from processes of “enclosure”, due both to the market and to public policies in favour of privatization, in their various forms. (2)

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Initiative des citoyens européens contre la privatisation de l’eau

426538_4817127739773_1902813107_n
Par Tommaso Fattori

Scarica il file dell’articolo

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Die Europäische BürgerInnen-Initiative für Wasser als Menschenrecht und die „austeritäre” Postdemokratie


Von Tommaso Fattori

Der Neoliberalismus hat die Krise dazu benutzt, soziale Rechte zu beseitigen und die Gemeingüter in Form öffentlicher Waren und Dienstleistungen zu privatisieren.

Mit anderen Worten: Die Austeritätspolitik ist ein Instrument des Neoliberalismus, wobei das Ziel dieser Politik in der Ausbeutung der durch die Krise eröffneten Möglichkeiten besteht und nicht in der Überwindung derselben. Worum es dabei geht ist die Fortsetzung, wenn nicht sogar Beschleunigung der Umverteilung von Einkommen, Reichtum und politischer Macht von unten nach oben, die seit den 1980er Jahren stattfindet: eine verkehrte Umverteilung, die durch die plötzlich einsetzende Krise und das Versagen neoliberaler Politik bedroht schien. Aktuell sind inmitten einer Krise der Überproduktion die öffentlichen Dienstleistungen zu einem weiteren Kolonisierungsgebiet für das Kapital geworden, womit seine unausgesetzte Belohnung mit immer höheren Profitmargen sichergestellt wird.

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Fluid Democracy: The Italian Water Revolution

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By Tommaso Fattori

From Commons to the referendum

Earth, water, air and fire (what we would call, in contemporary terms, energy) have, for thousands of years, been considered primary elements and the common base materials of life, ever since the dawn of Western philosophical thought in ancient Greece. In the Metamorphosis by Ovid – a classic of Latin literature written more than two thousand years ago – the goddess Latona thus addresses a group of peasants who refuse to allow her to drink from a pool: “Why do you refuse me water? The common use of water is the sacred right of all mankind. Nature allows to no one to claim as property the sunshine, the air, or the water. When I drew near, it was a public good I came to share. Yet I ask it of you a favour (…). A draught of water would be nectar to me; it would revive me, and I would own myself indebted to you for life itself”. These words condense the elements that were to proper legal regulation more than five hundred years later, in the Justinian Code.